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The 2,451st CyberAlert. Tracking Liberal Media Bias Since 1996
5:45am EDT, Monday July 23, 2007 (Vol. Twelve; No. 124)

 
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1. Spike Movie's Iraq War Vet Earns Applause for Denouncing the War
The first part of Spike TV's mini-series, The Kill Point, on Sunday night featured a scene in which an Iraq war veteran bank robber holding hostages earned applause from a crowd outside the bank when he denounced the war. Walking outside the bank to meet the police negotiator, "Mr. Wolf" played by John Leguizamo, a former Marine Corps Sergeant who served a year in Leavenworth for disobeying an order that apparently led to the deaths of other Marines, removed his shirt and pants to show scars from his war wounds. He proclaimed: "I didn't spill my blood for this country for freedom to have it taken away when I came home. I got some demands because they took everything away from me," citing the loss of medical coverage for his wife after his conviction. "Wolf" shouted his demands: "I want a flak jacket for every soldier in Iraq! Because our stupid-ass government doesn't think that they're necessary. And I want the son of every Senator who voted yes for this war to sign up for active duty." That led to applause from the civilians in the street watching the unfolding drama, with a few even jumping up and down in approval.

2. CNN/You Tube Preview Questions from the Left on Health, Religion
Last week CNN aired hour-long specials at 8pm EDT to promote their Monday night YouTube presidential debates with Democratic candidates, but CNN's selection of submitted videos showcased many more with a leftist slant than from a conservative viewpoint. Of the videos aired last Monday, for example, distinctly liberal video submissions outnumbered conservative ones by a margin of 8 to 1 (though a slim majority of total videos shown were neutral or non-partisan). On Wednesday night, CNN was again particularly adamant in their use of video submissions calling for universal or socialized health care. And on Thursday night, Zahn led the segment on faith and values by asserting that "we are seeing an amazing variety of questions about faith and values for next Monday's debate." Yet, the four YouTube questions that followed were anything but a "variety" with concerns about the interests of atheists and one man "worried about the amount of time given to evangelical concerns, while secular voters are more or less getting snubbed." AUDIO&VIDEO See & Hear the Bias - Audio & Video Clip Archive

3. ABC Honors Clinton with Interview on 'Work to Save a Continent'
ABC's Good Morning America interviewed Bill Clinton on Thursday morning, and while he made the news for saying Iraq is hopeless ("There is no military victory here"), the interview was also notable as another opportunity for ABC to honor Clinton as a global statesman and ask him softball questions for almost nine minutes. Co-host Diane Sawyer reported he was in Africa to see Nelson Mandela and do his AIDS work: "And President Bill Clinton weighs in, speaking out on the war, his work to save a continent and Senator Hillary Clinton's campaign. An exclusive interview." When the interview began nine minutes into the July 19 show, Sawyer lauded his humanitarian foundation work again, saving hundreds of thousands of people: "And we turn now to an exclusive interview with former President Bill Clinton, who is in Johannesburg South Africa this week as part of his life's work with his foundation which has provided life saving treatments for nearly 800,000 children and adults with AIDS in Africa and also simple solutions like fertilizer to revolutionize agricultural production."

4. Moyers Scolded on Impeachment, Bode: Bush Crimes 'Impeachable'
PBS Ombudsman Michael Getler has to be getting uncomfortable for calling out unbalanced liberal programs on the taxpayer-funded network. After he agreed with critics that a pro-Kerry editorial was wildly out of place on the History Detectives show, now he has noticed the incredibly one-sided July 13 Bill Moyers Journal hour on impeaching Bush and Cheney and mildly noted it could have used a smidgen of balance. Despite Nancy Pelosi's promise to avoid impeachment hearings, he wrote: "I would argue that it is still a newsworthy topic. So, as a viewer, I'm grateful that it is being addressed....On the other hand, there was almost a complete absence of balance, as I watched it, in the way this program presented the case for impeachment proceedings against President Bush and Vice President Cheney." Picking up on the theme of the Moyers show, former NBC News and CNN political correspondent Ken Bode, now Ombudsman for the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, agreed Bush's "crimes are real and probably impeachable, and the monarchial arrogance of the Bush-Cheney administration is monumental," but for political reasons, "the timing is wrong" for impeachment.

5. AP: Tammy Faye a 'Symbol of Greed and Hypocrisy in 1980s America'
Tammy Faye Messner -- who became infamous as Tammy Faye Bakker -- died Saturday of cancer. Jim Bakker and his wife were rich fodder for the liberal media as their "PTL" televangelism empire collapsed in 1988 and their financial excesses were exposed, right down to the air-conditioned doghouse. Liberal media types found the Bakkers to be the very model of Reagan's Decade of Greed back then. Apparently, that liberal line was not retired. In his report on Messner's death, Associated Press reporter Steve Hartsoe concluded: "For many, the TV image of then-Mrs. Bakker forgiving husband Jim's infidelities, tears streaking her cheeks with mascara, became a symbol for the wages of greed and hypocrisy in 1980s America."


 

Spike Movie's Iraq War Vet Earns Applause
for Denouncing the War

     The first part of Spike TV's mini-series, The Kill Point, on Sunday night featured a scene in which an Iraq war veteran bank robber holding hostages earned applause from a crowd outside the bank when he denounced the war. Walking outside the bank to meet the police negotiator, "Mr. Wolf" played by John Leguizamo, a former Marine Corps Sergeant who served a year in Leavenworth for disobeying an order that apparently led to the deaths of other Marines, removed his shirt and pants to show scars from his war wounds. He proclaimed: "I didn't spill my blood for this country for freedom to have it taken away when I came home. I got some demands because they took everything away from me," citing the loss of medical coverage for his wife after his conviction. "Wolf" shouted his demands: "I want a flak jacket for every soldier in Iraq! Because our stupid-ass government doesn't think that they're necessary. And I want the son of every Senator who voted yes for this war to sign up for active duty." That led to applause from the civilians in the street watching the unfolding drama, with a few even jumping up and down in approval.

     [This item was posted Sunday night on the MRC's blog, NewsBusters.org: newsbusters.org

     The Internet Movie Database's bio page for John Leguizamo: www.imdb.com

     As detailed in the July 19 CyberAlert, the eight-hour mini-series is centered around a group of Iraq war vets who rob a Pittsburgh bank, but end up taking hostages when police arrive before they can flee. The CBS/Viacom channel mini-series about the siege began Sunday night with a two-hour premiere and will air weekly in one and two-hour installments on Sunday nights through August. For the July 19 CyberAlert: www.mrc.org

     The rant from the bitter ex-Marine as he stood outside the bank addressing the negotiator, police snipers and the crowd, an event carried live on local television:

I love my country, man. I fought for my country and I would die for my country. Do you think I wanted to end up here? Do you think I wanted guns in my face again, man? No way. No freakin' way. But I came home to sickness and nightmares. You know when I close my eyes you know what I see? I see the faces of the soldiers and civilians that I killed, that's what I see. I spoke to my captain and he makes me talk to a shrink who doesn't know shit. Then the God damned government smokes me out with their lies and away goes my pension, away goes my medical. And if my wife gets sick, who's going to pay for it? Who's going to pay? I pay. We pay. I served my country, man. I served 15 years I gave, 15 years. Who's going to protect me? Who's going to protect me, huh, who?

So I started this and look where I am, man, look where I am, back in the firing line. So maybe you should shoot me, go ahead, maybe you should shoot me. I'd rather die than go to jail, that's for damn sure. I didn't spill my blood for this country for freedom to have it taken away when I came home. I got some demands because they took everything away from me, okay.

I want antibiotics 'cause I got injured in there. And I want a flak jacket for every soldier in Iraq! Because our stupid-ass government doesn't think that they're necessary. And I want the son of every Senator who voted yes for this war to sign up for active duty. You get me those things! And I'll leave here. I'll ask for bus and a chopper and I'll disappear. Got that?

     Spike's page for the mini-series: www.spiketv.com

 

CNN/You Tube Preview Questions from the
Left on Health, Religion

     Last week CNN aired hour-long specials at 8pm EDT to promote their Monday night YouTube presidential debates with Democratic candidates, but CNN's selection of submitted videos showcased many more with a leftist slant than from a conservative viewpoint. Of the videos aired last Monday, for example, distinctly liberal video submissions outnumbered conservative ones by a margin of 8 to 1 (though a slim majority of total videos


| |
More See & Hear the Bias

shown were neutral or non-partisan). On Wednesday night, CNN was again particularly adamant in their use of video submissions calling for universal or socialized health care. And on Thursday night, Zahn led the segment on faith and values by asserting that "we are seeing an amazing variety of questions about faith and values for next Monday's debate." Yet, the four YouTube questions that followed were anything but a "variety" with concerns about the interests of atheists and one man "worried about the amount of time given to evangelical concerns, while secular voters are more or less getting snubbed."

     The July 18 CyberAlert recounted: Of the videos aired on Monday's CNN/You Tube preview, a disproportionate number were distinctly liberal. Of the 19 individual videos shown (excluding some brief, zany clips), ten were politically neutral, eight were liberal or critical of conservative and/or Republican policies, and only one was clearly conservative. See: www.mrc.org

     [This item is culled from Friday NewsBusters blog postings by MRC interns Michael Lanza: newsbusters.org

     And Joe Steigerwald: newsbusters.org
     On Wednesday night, July 18, CNN recycled a video that had already aired on Monday, despite that fact that some 1,400 videos had been posted on YouTube at that point. The video was submitted by Kim of Long Island, New York who is battling cancer: "I'm thirty-six years old and hope to be a future breast cancer survivor...Like millions of Americans, I've gone for years without health insurance...What would you, as president, do to make low cost or free preventative medicine available for everybody in this country?"

     During the video, Kim removed her wig to reveal a bald head, presumably from the effects of chemotherapy. The video, indeed heartbreaking, was one of many submissions aired by CNN promoting universal or government-assisted health care:

     - From Jim Pence of Kentucky: "The place that I worked at for 35 years promised me healthcare insurance as part of my retirement package; they broke their promise...Members of Congress have the best healthcare insurance money can buy, paid for with my tax dollars. Why should I pay for their healthcare insurance when they didn't bother to protect mine?"

     - CNN also aired a video from little Susie Flynn, who claimed to be "running for President." Behind Susie was what appeared to be her campaign van complete with a banner that read: "SUSIE FLYNN FOR PRESIDENT" and "9 million uninsured children need a solution now."

     Susie Flynn's question: "Children are the least expensive to insure compared to other costs the government easily funds...Why is it so difficult to find the money to insure them?"

     - Ann Carter of Charleston also weighed in. "My father suffers from diabetes...I want to know what you intend to do to emphasize provision in your healthcare plan so that the cost and burden of common disease is decreased for future generations."

     Missing from the CNN preview hours: Videos critical of government intervention in healthcare.

     On Thursday night, July 19, Paula Zahn previewed some of the video questions that had been sent in. The topics up for debate included faith and values, the environment and gay rights. Zahn led the segment on faith and values with the comment, "we are seeing an amazing variety of questions about faith and values for next Monday's debate." Unfortunately the four YouTube questions that followed were anything but a "variety." The questions aired:

     - Zennie Abraham, Oakland, California: "This quarter reads 'United States of America.' And when I turn it over, you find that it reads 'Liberty. In God We Trust.' What do those words mean to you?"

     - Stephen Marsh, Thousand Oaks, California: "I'm worried about the amount of time given to evangelical concerns, while secular voters are more or less getting snubbed. Am I wrong in fearing a Democratic administration that may pay lip service to be extremely religious as much as the current one?"

     - Kevin, Seattle, Washington: "I am part of a very large group here on YouTube that has been traditionally marginalized by the political process. And that is atheists. For anybody brave enough to take it, what will do you to represent my interests and the interests of other Americans who do not profess a belief in God?"

     - Monty Knight, Charleston, South Carolina: "As President of our local chapter of Americans United for the Separation of Church and State, as in the First Amendment to our nation's Constitution, my question is this. Does one have to be the right kind of Christian to be elected president of our great nation?"

     Aside from the first question, which is politically neutral (but a complete softball,) each had a distinctly liberal flare to them.

 

ABC Honors Clinton with Interview on
'Work to Save a Continent'

     ABC's Good Morning America interviewed Bill Clinton on Thursday morning, and while he made the news for saying Iraq is hopeless ("There is no military victory here"), the interview was also notable as another opportunity for ABC to honor Clinton as a global statesman and ask him softball questions for almost nine minutes. Co-host Diane Sawyer reported he was in Africa to see Nelson Mandela and do his AIDS work: "And President Bill Clinton weighs in, speaking out on the war, his work to save a continent and Senator Hillary Clinton's campaign. An exclusive interview."

     When the interview began nine minutes into the July 19 show, Sawyer lauded his humanitarian foundation work again, saving hundreds of thousands of people: "And we turn now to an exclusive interview with former President Bill Clinton, who is in Johannesburg South Africa this week as part of his life's work with his foundation which has provided life saving treatments for nearly 800,000 children and adults with AIDS in Africa and also simple solutions like fertilizer to revolutionize agricultural production."

     [This item, by Tim Graham, was posted Friday on the MRC's blog, NewsBusters.org: newsbusters.org

     Are these tributes coming from the heart, or are they a condition of getting the exclusive interview? You'd have to guess they're heartfelt, since even when the former President grants interviews to all the national outlets, the questions are typically soft as the Snuggle bear.

     The MRC's Scott Whitlock provided the transcript and noted the interview segment lasted eight minutes and 57 seconds. The ABC graphic during the interview was "Bill Clinton One on One: On the War And His Mission." Sawyer's first question was on Iraq. She included the note that generals Peter Pace and Raymond Odierno are seeing some progress in Iraq as she introduced her taped interview:

     Sawyer: "Mr. President, so good to have you with us this morning. Thank you. If you were still president and these were your generals, these were your generals, saying give me more time, would you give them more time?"
     Former President Bill Clinton: "I think the problem is, first of all, I think there is some evidence that changes from day to day. But while the violence is going up in many places, where we have more soldiers and where the Iraqis are fighting the outside insurgents like the al Qaeda insurgents in the Sunni areas, we've had some evidence of progress. The point is, that there is no military victory here. And there is no evidence that, whether we have a good or bad day in a particular community or region in Iraq, that we have either the political reconciliation process within the country working or any diplomatic process that's got a chance to help with the neighbors. That, it seems to me, is the larger point."
     Sawyer: "So there's nothing General Petraeus could be saying in September that would convince you of anything, but start pulling the troops out?"
     Clinton: "Well, I believe that General Petraeus is a very able man. And I don't have any doubt that they'll win some battles. And I hope this works. I think every American hopes this works. But it can't work beyond winning a few battles. It has to, it has to be accompanied by, and he has a few weeks, the Iraqis have a few weeks to do it, it has to be accompanied by progress on the political front. The President has weathered the challenge in the Senate because of the filibuster. As long as he can hold more than 40 senators, he can stop the Senate from voting for a change in course. But in the end, September will come, and it won't be long."

     Next, Sawyer turned to the Elizabeth Edwards comments to Salon.com, and to her credit, Sawyer didn't clip the harsher line about Hillary behaving "as a man" by avoiding "women's issues." (A Kate Snow story on the ABC web site edited out that line, though.) Sawyer read the line, and then only asked vaguely for a response. It wasn't designed to ruffle his feathers.

     Sawyer: "A very quick question about some political news this morning and then I want to turn to the important work in Africa. As you know, the wife of Senator John Edwards, Elizabeth Edwards, has said of Senator Clinton, 'I'm not convinced she'd be as good an advocate for women,' meaning as Senator Edwards would be, and says, 'Sometimes you feel you have to behave as a man and not talk about women's issues. I'm sympathetic. She wants to be commander in chief.' Do you have a response to her?"
     Clinton: "No. You know, I like Elizabeth Edwards and I admire the struggle she's going through and I admire the fact that she's supporting her husband. She ought to be. But the thing I like about this presidential race is I don't have to be against any of these candidates. I like them all. But if you look at the record on women's issues, I defy you to find anybody who has run for office in recent history whose got a longer history of working for women, for families and children, than Hillary does. I'm proud of Hillary's record and her lifetime commitment and I don't think she's trying to be a man. I don't think it's inconsistent with being a woman that you can also be knowledgeable on military and security affairs and be strong when the occasion demands it. That's, I don't consider that being manly. I consider that being a leader."

     When Sawyer turned to AIDS in Africa, the typical pattern kicked in: Slick Willie got to start a lecture that goes on and on before a follow-up emerged. His first AIDS answer lasted a minute and forty seconds before they hit the edit button.

     Sawyer: "All right. I do want to turn to Africa now. You were, I believe, the first American president ever to go to South Africa and I know for the past five years as part of the foundation you've been going every single year. Two million Africans died of AIDS last year. Is there a benchmark you can give Americans for when you think the tide can turn if enough is done?"
     Clinton: "Yes. I think, when we have, I think there are two benchmarks. When we have the number of new infections going down, and when we are well over two thirds of all those who need treatment are getting it. And the reason I use two thirds is this: An enormous percentage of Africans who are HIV positive don't know they're HIV positive until they get sick. The more people we treat, the more people are willing to be tested, because they're aware of the disease, they see there is no stigma then. They know they'll live if they turn out to be HIV positive because they'll get treatment. As soon as that happens, you'll see responsible activity going up and the number of new infections going down. We now have, just in my foundation, in Africa, India, China, the Caribbean, the whole Asia, rest of Asia, we have about 750,000 people getting treatment off our contracts. And there are probably two thirds more, that is, that's about a third of those in the world getting treatment and there are about two thirds more getting treatment from the United States program, the global fund on HTB and malaria and other smaller endeavors around the world. So we've really ramped up the number of people getting treatment to about, I suppose there are about 2.2 million people, two and a quarter this year getting treatment, maybe a little more.. But I think, by the end of the year, there will be more than three million people on treatment and more and more children."
     Sawyer: "The Bush administration has tied some of its funding to abstinence education. Is that a good thing or not?"
     Clinton: "I think it shouldn't be mandatory. I think that abstinence plus is a good strategy and several African countries have used it to good effect. I think abstinence only is a loser in a country where either the culture is against it or where the AIDS infection rate is already so high. But I thinkÔ€" I have no problem. I think abstinence should be a part of the strategy, particularly when you're dealing with younger kids."
     Sawyer: "As you know, a lot of Americans still ask a question, and it's a good threshold question, which is why Africa? There's so much work that needs to be done here in America."
     Clinton: "I think that it's not an either/or question. I believe that we've learned in Iraq and I think we've learned in Afghanistan and I believe, ironically, we're learning in Africa from the successes. A recent international poll showed that, while opinion of America is down almost everywhere in the world, it's up in all the African countries where we have a heavy presence working on AIDS and malaria and development. It's much cheaper than defense, spending money here, and it builds a world with more partners and fewer enemies, which is important. That doesn't mean we shouldn't be working on poverty and health care and economic inequality and education in the United States. But this is a very tiny percentage of our overall budget, and so it would be good for us to do. It's also the morally right thing to do, to try to help these children grow up and have their lives. But I can tell you that it's a very good investment for America, and it's a tiny percentage of the federal government's overall funding. Americans spend much less on this kind of foreign assistance than most people know and it's much more effective than most people know."
     Sawyer: "Again, Mr. President, thanks so much for being with us on this busy morning. Thank you."
     Clinton: "Thank you, Diane."

     Clinton's answers -- especially his deft touch on trash-talking cancer sufferer Elizabeth Edwards -- were smooth. But Clinton's smoothness has always been much enhanced by liberal interviewers who are extremely hesitant to interrupt and appalled at the notion of throwing him a high fastball. Any major-league pitch can draw one of those Fox News Sunday temper tantrums. Sawyer even concluded on a note that would make Clinton look humble: "And a small foot note. As the President was leaving, I asked about the much-reported moment of mistaken identity when a couple of women saw him in the July 4th parade, started screaming excitedly and said, 'It's Bob Barker.' Here is what he said."
     Clinton: "I heard about that. I don't know if it's true or not. But I'll take it. Whatever it is. As long as they're screaming, that's good. At my age, any scream is a good scream. [Laughs]"
     Sawyer: "A footnote from the campaign trail, Robin."
     Robin Roberts: "Any scream is a good scream."

 

Moyers Scolded on Impeachment, Bode:
Bush Crimes 'Impeachable'

     PBS Ombudsman Michael Getler has to be getting uncomfortable for calling out unbalanced liberal programs on the taxpayer-funded network. After he agreed with critics that a pro-Kerry editorial was wildly out of place on the History Detectives show, now he has noticed the incredibly one-sided July 13 Bill Moyers Journal hour on impeaching Bush and Cheney and mildly noted it could have used a smidgen of balance. Despite Nancy Pelosi's promise to avoid impeachment hearings, he wrote: "I would argue that it is still a newsworthy topic. So, as a viewer, I'm grateful that it is being addressed....On the other hand, there was almost a complete absence of balance, as I watched it, in the way this program presented the case for impeachment proceedings against President Bush and Vice President Cheney."

     Picking up on the theme of the Moyers show, former NBC News and CNN political correspondent Ken Bode, now Ombudsman for the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, agreed Bush's "crimes are real and probably impeachable, and the monarchial arrogance of the Bush-Cheney administration is monumental," but for political reasons, "the timing is wrong" for impeachment.

     [This item is adapted from a Saturday posting, by Tim Graham, on the MRC's NewsBusters blog: newsbusters.org

     For more on the July 13 Bill Moyers Journal, check the July 17 CyberAlert article, "PBS Devotes Hour of Moyers to Advocating Bush-Cheney Impeachment," online at: www.mrc.org

     For more on Getler's criticism of the History Detectives show, go to the July 19 CyberAlert item, "PBS Ombudsman Calls Foul on Blatant Claim Kerry 'Smeared' in '04," online at: www.mrc.org

     Getler's July 20 PBS ombudsman column praised Moyers and his guests for some educational television (and most of the letters he reproduces are rave reviews). He concluded: "This was an hour-long program and it was, in many ways, an education, listening to this view of the impeachment process being laid out, whether or not you agree with it. But the program, in my view, would have been not only less vulnerable to charges of political bias, but also even more educational to more people in terms of illuminating the public about impeachment, if it had contained at the very least a succinct summary of the likely legal challenges to each of the main charges raised by the pro-impeachment process guests."

     It would have been a lot easier to do that by having more of a debate. But Getler failed to address several issues, such as the outrageous historical comparisons guest Bruce Fein used, comparing Bush to the Nazis and the Soviets, and he failed to consider that PBS had no such "educational" hour when the House considered impeaching President Clinton, displaying a bias when comparing past to present.

     Getler's column: www.pbs.org

     CPB Ombudsman Ken Bode, a former political reporter for NBC and CNN, did not comment on the Moyers impeachment show on his official blog, although he did strangely condemn the Moyers program that started his latest incarnation of the Journal show -- for not including any critique of PBS and its failure to prevent war in Iraq. However, Bode did write a sharp-elbowed piece in the Indianapolis Star about the Moyers show and impeachment. He listed "Bush administration crimes," and insisted Bush had a "monumental" amount of "monarchical arrogance." But he still thought the timing wasn't right for Pelosi to pounce:

Charges: Guantanamo. Abu Ghraib. Rendition. Indefinite detention. Starting a war of aggression in Iraq without cause. Hiding and torturing captives without due process. Illegal wiretapping. Some would add obstructing honest elections and gross negligence in failing to assist New Orleans after Katrina.

The list of Bush administration crimes is very real, but I have not paid much attention to the blogs, petitions and other efforts to promote impeachment, on the theory that they are diversionary to the more important efforts to end the war in Iraq. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said, "Impeachment is not on the table," which I thought was good politics. Then a friend urged me to look at last Friday's PBS broadcast of "Bill Moyers Journal," a program devoted to putting the case for impeachment in a more serious context....

Only through impeachment hearings is it possible to concentrate the mind of the public on the monarchical arrogance and sneering attitude of George W. Bush. "I am king," Fein says of Bush's view of executive powers....

The crimes are real and probably impeachable, and the monarchial arrogance of the Bush-Cheney administration is monumental. But the timing is wrong.

     END of Excerpt

     For Bode's July 20 column in full: www.indystar.com

     Once again, CPB only really wanted a partisan liberal ombudsman, or else they would have replaced conservative co-ombudsman William Schulz, which they never have. The PBS system is turning into Bush Hater Headquarters without even timid Republican majorities to discourage the natural leftist tendencies of public broadcasting.

 

AP: Tammy Faye a 'Symbol of Greed and
Hypocrisy in 1980s America'

     Tammy Faye Messner -- who became infamous as Tammy Faye Bakker -- died Saturday of cancer. Jim Bakker and his wife were rich fodder for the liberal media as their "PTL" televangelism empire collapsed in 1988 and their financial excesses were exposed, right down to the air-conditioned doghouse. Liberal media types found the Bakkers to be the very model of Reagan's Decade of Greed back then. Apparently, that liberal line was not retired. In his report on Messner's death, Associated Press reporter Steve Hartsoe concluded: "For many, the TV image of then-Mrs. Bakker forgiving husband Jim's infidelities, tears streaking her cheeks with mascara, became a symbol for the wages of greed and hypocrisy in 1980s America."

     For the Raleigh-datelined AP dispatch: news.yahoo.com

     As the MRC's Notable Quotables cited almost 17 years ago, in a December 29, 1990 column, then-former Washington Post editor and then-current columnist Haynes Johnson asserted:
     "To the self-indulgent age of the '80s and to the characters that gave it special flavor at home -- Oliver L. North and Ronald Reagan, Michael Milken and Ivan Boesky, Jim and Tammy Faye Bakker, Arthur Laffer and his curve, the Yuppies and the leveraged buyout dealmakers -- good riddance."

     Johnson -- one of the Post's most dramatic liberal hacks -- was a regular on Washington Week in Review and The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer on PBS. For a time, Johnson was even included mysteriously on the NewsHour's panel of historians.

-- Brent Baker

 


 


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